Dr. Philip Landrigan, children’s health advocate

Dr. Philip Landrigan, one of the world’s leading advocates of children’s health whose pioneering research on the effects of lead poisoning in children contributed to the U.S. government’s decision to remove lead from gasoline and paint, will present “The Impact of Pollution on Planetary Health: Emergence of an Underappreciated Risk Factor” on Oct. 12 at 7:00 p.m. in Gasson Hall, Room 100. A pediatrician, epidemiologist, and leader in public health and preventive medicine, Dr. Landrigan is a professor of environmental medicine, public health and pediatrics and dean for global health in the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. His leadership of a National Academy of Sciences Committee on pesticides in children’s diets generated widespread understanding that children are uniquely vulnerable to toxic chemicals in the environment and helped to secure the passage of the Food Quality Protection Act of 1996. It also led to the establishment of EPA’s Office of Children’s Health Protection. He was a leader in developing the National Children’s Study, the largest epidemiological study of children’s health and the environment ever launched in the US. A Boston College graduate, he is the co-author of  Raising Healthy Children in a Toxic World: 101 Smart Solutions for Every FamilyRaising Children Toxic Free: How to Keep Your Child Safe From Lead, Asbestos, Pesticides and Other Environmental Hazards, and the upcoming Children and Environmental Toxins: What Everyone Needs to Know. Sponsor: Park Street Corporation Speaker Series.

This entry was posted in Alumni Authors and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s